To Tag or Not to Tag

My amazing, inspiring bride, Laura

My amazing, inspiring bride, Laura

I just received a question from Kyle - a friend who serves at a neighboring church in our area. 

Do our greeters wear name tags or only those serving at our Guest Services center? 

I've had dozens of conversations with churches asking a similar question, but much to my own surprise, I don't think I've addressed it in writing 'til now. Thanks for the prompt, Kyle! 

To Tag or Not to Tag

At Granger Community we want to remove all the barriers we can to build bridges that quickly connect people. Name tags are one small way we do that. In a quick list format, here's what we've learned and practice: 

  • Name tags on our guest services team members help guests recognize: "This is someone I can approach for help." That's everyone on every guest services team: traffic team, guest services center, greeters, ushers, children's checkin team, campus guides, cafe and bookstore team.
  • We don't ask guests to wear name tags. Some of them want to be anonymous. Remembering names is our job. 
  • As you'll see in the picture above, we used to print our team member's entire name: first and last. Now - it's only their first name. In our social media, easy to track and stalk culture, we've taken this step to provide a small amount of protection for our teams. When a connection is made, it's perfectly appropriate for a team member to share an email, phone number or other contact info to help followup with a guest. But, we'll not make the decision for them. 
  • We use "guest services" as our blanket term for all things related to serving our guests. So although we have a guest services center, every team is responsible for serving our guests.  Our guests don't really care about labels beyond that. They don't need to decipher greeter from usher from campus guide to get the help they need. 
  • One more thing. We abandoned lanyards. Wise women on our teams who preferred eye contact with guests noted the ill-placed name tag on their... yes, their chest. We now use magnetized name tags that are worn appropriately higher. Yeah, I just went there, so your guest doesn't have to. 

What's your practice with name tags? What's working? What's clarifying?